The EID Mandala 2017

The Friends of Ropner Park and the Commmunity Welfare Trust commissioned  artist Adrian Moule to lead the formation of a mandala at the EID Fusion Festival in 2017.  Adrian is  a Painter, Printmaker and Community Development worker.

Adrian Moule

The EID Mandala 2017

In a quiet corner of a Marquee at the EID Festival in July, artist Adrian Moule begins to set out the cloth for a Mandala.

Mandala Centre based on the River Tees

A mandala is a complex abstract design that is usually circular in form. In fact, “mandala” is a Sanskrit word that means “circle”. Mandalas generally have one identifiable centre point, from which emanates an array of symbols, shapes and forms.

There are mandalas in many cultures, Mexican, Aztec, Celtic and there are also other types or   versions of the Mandala and they are used for many reasons. Mandalas are often formed using different coloured sands. In the EID mandala the colours were provided by different coloured pulses.

Adrian`s summed up the afternoon….. “At the Eid festival the young people were drawn to each other through their activity, they all understood this was a special thing and related to it with reverence. Some came with the anxiety of not wanting to spoil it and once in their own zone they relaxed and engaged.  Others had the confidence to do something and then found that the Mandala was not at all forgiving and expected more from them.

Working on the  mandala

This is a special way of working that I have developed over time and each mandala starts with a unique central area, in this case I used the river Tees as the catalyst and selected icons of what might be found on the river bank, towns, churches, Mosques, factories and homes.  Then the young people have enough space to bring their ideas to the artwork.  In this case they had helping hands, flowers and angels, they brought to it more than the images they made.”

The internet throws up a lot of information.  Such as “A mandala is an integrated structure organised around a unifying centre.”

Mandala Centre

 Another Comment is that an audience or “viewer” is necessary to create a mandala. Where there is no you, there is no mandala. 

Completed Mandala

 

At the end of the afternoon the cloth was lifted and the pattern disappeared. There is no permanent display. All that is left is in the photographs and more importantly in the memories of those who contributed to its formation.      That`s the way it is with mandalas.